Second Response

September 2020

Indiana Disaster Response Missions Presentation - Click HERE

Disaster Supplies Kit

Assemble a disaster supplies kit with items you may need in case of an evacuation. Store these supplies in sturdy, easy-to-carry containers, such as backpacks or duffel bags. Keep important family documents in a waterproof container. Keep a smaller disaster supplies kit in the trunk of your car.

• Water: 3 gallons/person and additional 4 gallons/person and pet if confined to home

• Food: a 3-day supply and at least an additional 4-day supply per person or pet for use at home. You may want to consider stocking a two-week supply of food (with a long shelf life such as MREs or Freeze Dried) and water in your home.

• Items for infants: including formula, diapers, bottles, pacifiers, powdered milk and medications not requiring refrigeration

• Items for seniors, disabled persons or anyone with serious allergies—including special foods, denture items, extra eyeglasses, hearing aid batteries, prescription and non-prescription medications that are regularly used, inhalers and other essential equipment.

• Kitchen accessories: a manual can opener; mess kits or disposable cups, plates and utensils; utility knife; sugar and salt; aluminum foil and plastic wrap; re-seal-able plastic bags

• A portable, battery-powered radio or television and extra, fresh batteries

• Several flashlights and extra, fresh batteries

• A first-aid kit

• One complete change of clothing and footwear for each person: including sturdy work shoes or boots, rain-gear and other items adjusted for the season, such as hats and gloves, thermal underwear, sunglasses, dust masks

• Blankets or a sleeping bag for each person

• Sanitation and hygiene items: shampoo, deodorant, toothpaste, toothbrushes, comb and brush, lip balm, sunscreen, contact lenses and supplies and any medications regularly used, toilet paper, towelettes, soap, hand sanitizer, liquid detergent, feminine supplies, plastic garbage bags (heavy-duty) and ties (for personal sanitation uses), medium-sized plastic bucket with tight lid, disinfectant, household chlorine bleach

• Other essential items: paper, pencil, needles, thread, small A-B-C-type fire extinguisher, medicine dropper, whistle, emergency preparedness manual

• Entertainment: including games and books, favorite dolls and stuffed animals for small children

• A map of the area marked with places you could go and their telephone numbers

• An extra set of keys and ids: including keys for cars and any properties owned and copies of driver’s licenses, passports and work identification badges

• Cash and coins and copies of credit cards

• Copies of medical prescriptions

• Matches in a waterproof container

• A small tent, compass and shovel

Consider preparing a Disaster Supplies Kit for your pets

 

Family Emergency Plan

An important severe weather safety tip is to make sure a family emergency plan is set in place.

Gather information about hazards. Learn your community’s warning signals and evacuation plans. The Federal Emergency Management Agency can help you prepare for hazards at: www.fema.gov/plan/index.shtm

Meet with your family to create a plan. Discuss the plan and pick two places to meet: a spot outside your home and a location away from your neighborhood in case you can’t return home. Choose an out-of-state friend as your “family check-in contact” to call if the family gets separated.

Implement your plan.

• Post emergency telephone numbers by phones and put numbers into cell phone address book

• Install safety features in your house, such as smoke detectors and fire extinguishers

• Inspect your home for potential hazards (such as items that can move, fall, break, or catch fire) and correct them

• As a family, learn basic safety measures, such as CPR and first aid; how to use a fire extinguisher; and how and when to turn off water, gas, and electricity in your home

• Teach children how and when to call 911; (6) Keep enough supplies in your home to meet your needs for at least three days.

Practice and maintain your plan. Ask questions to make sure your family remembers meeting places, phone numbers, and safety rules. Conduct drills. Test your smoke detectors monthly and change the batteries two times each year. Test and recharge your fire extinguisher(s) according to manufacturer’s instructions. Replace stored water and food every 6 months.

 

Safety is NO accident,

Bill McDonald

Indiana Knights of Columbus

Disaster Response Chair

812-689-6699

 

 Any donations you wish to make to the Indiana State Council, Charity Fund Inc.

    Send to:  Bob Lynch, PSD      3215 St. Jude Dr.      Indianapolis, In 46227

 

HERE is a reminder document about Tornado Safety Tips. HERE is a Tornado Safety Tips Poster.

In the aftermath of a tornado, workers may be involved in a variety of response and recovery operations. The following are general guidelines that may be applicable to workers involved in assessing and/or cleaning up the damage to their worksite. However, some operations, such as utility restoration, cleaning up spills of hazardous materials, and search and rescue, should only be conducted by workers who have the proper training, equipment and experience.

Potential Hazards: Response and recovery work in tornado-impacted areas presents safety and health hazards that should be properly identified, evaluated, and controlled in a systematic manner to reduce or eliminate occupational safety and health risks to response and recovery workers. Some of the specific hazards associated with working in the aftermath of tornadoes include:

  • Hazardous driving conditions due to slippery and/or blocked roadways
  • Slips and falls due to slippery walkways
  • Falling and flying objects such as tree limbs and utility poles
  • Sharp objects including nails and broken glass
  • Electrical hazards from downed power lines or downed objects in contact with power lines
  • Falls from heights
  • Burns from fires caused by energized line contact or equipment failure
  • Exhaustion from working extended shifts
  • Heat and Dehydration

General Precautions: Continue to monitor your local radio or television stations for emergency information and the potential of additional storms. Be aware of possible structural, electrical, or gas-leak hazards. 

  • If such hazards are identified, report them to the proper local authorities and/or utility.
  • Do not touch downed power lines or objects in contact with downed power lines.
  • Wear proper clothing when walking on or near debris, including boots and gloves.
  • Be careful around sharp objects, including nails and broken glass.
  • Use the proper safety precautions when operating generators, chainsaws, or other power tools.
  • Take steps to prevent heat illnesses and dehydration.
  • See the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website for additional precautions to take after a tornado.

Fact Sheets and Quick Cards: OSHA has the following materials to assist employers with assessing and controlling the hazards common to most response and recovery work in tornado-impacted areas.

For additional information see the Occupational Heat Exposure Safety and Health Topics page.

For more information, see other Emergency Response Resources from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) or for a full list of related materials, see the Additional Resources page.

 

Bill McDonald

DR Chair

 

Click below to read more about:

Indiana State Council Disaster Response Mission:

To promote education and training for Local and State Disaster Response Programs and assist Councils and their Members in the Indiana State Council jurisdiction during a disaster.  This is achieved thru a collaborative partnership with Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Indiana Disaster Response and The Indiana State Council Disaster Response Coordinator.

Emergency/Disaster Preparedness:

Being properly prepared for a likely disaster will determine if you will be a victim or survivor. Each member must prepare a personal/family disaster plan. It is only when we have taken care of ourselves and family can we respond effectively to our communities and parish. Each Council must also prepare a disaster plan to be implemented to carry out the Council missions and to provide assistance to its members to minimize the effects of a disaster.  

Communications is crucial during any emergency/disaster.

All emergency/disaster plans should include plans of communication to member, councils and state officers.  Traditional means of communication can be affected during a disaster. Alternate means need to be studied and used as needed.  The assistance of a neighboring Council should be considered in your Council Disaster Plans, as your members may be busy tending to their own families and property. Many times personal contact is the only means available, plan accordingly.

State Council Assistance:

The Knights of Columbus Indiana State Council has Disaster Response Trailer loaded with basic supplies and tools, available to loan to Councils to assist their members during the Early Response Phase of a disaster. The Grand Knight or Financial Secretary of a Council needs to contact the Indiana State Council Disaster Response Coordinator to request its use.  In most circumstances the trailer will be delivered to the site requested. At that point the Council is responsible for the safety of the trailer and its contents. 

Partnerships:

The Indiana State Council Disaster Response Program has agreed to a collaborative partnership with Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Indianapolis Disaster Response to be a force multiplier during times of emergency/disasters.  Catholic Charities has been involved in Disaster Response for many years and are consider one of the Nations experts in this field. It is the goal of this partnership to reduce duplications of services and resources.

Under this collaborative effort Indiana Knights will be trained, supervised, and deployed thru Catholic Charities to provide continuity in training, planning and execution of services for Early Response and Long Term Recovery Programs. This by no means prevents Councils from providing services directly to their Community First Responders and/or Parishes.   To the contrary part of the Council Disaster Preparedness Plan should include contacting other community organizations and establishing local partnerships. Open communication and coordination will reduce duplication of services and resources which will lead to a smooth and effective recovery.

Preparedness Checklist:

  • Make a plan about potential emergencies/disaster and how to deal with them.
  • Practice and maintain your plans. Communicate with members and adjoining Councils.
  • Build an emergency first aid and supply kit.
  • Keep Informed
  • Know your community and neighbors
  • The question to keep asking is “ WHAT IF “

For additional information check with

  • Indiana Department of Homeland Security.com
  • Indiana Emergency Response and Recovery
  • Indiana State Council Disaster Response Coordinator 
  • Bill McDonald at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  812-689-6699

 Bill McDonald

Disaster Response Chairman
812-689-6699
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

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